The Pet Industry's Leading Resource for News & Content Distribution
ACVIM Logo for PetPR.com

New Study Reveals Association Between Dry Food Diet and Increased Risk of Diabetes in Normal-Weight Cats

ACVIM Publishes Largest Case-Control Study about Environmental Risk Factors for Feline Diabetes in its Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine

DENVER, CO (January 19, 2016) – A recent study conducted by researchers at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences found an increased risk of Diabetes Mellitus (Type 2) in normal-weight cats that consume a dry food diet, which is commonly fed to cats worldwide. 

The study, “Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Cats,” was published online December 1, 2016, and will be included in the January/February digital issue of the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM), the official publication of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM).

“Through our research we found that while obesity is a very important and prominent risk factor for Diabetes Mellitus in cats, there is also an increased risk of diabetes among normal-weight cats consuming a dry food diet,” said Malin Öhlund, DVM, Department of Clinical Services at the Swedish University of Agricultural Science and lead researcher on the study. “This correlation, compared to normal-weight cats on a wet food diet, is a new and interesting finding that warrants further research, as a dry food diet is commonly fed to cats around the world.”

This study investigated both new and known risk factors associated with Diabetes Mellitus in cats. In addition to an increased risk among normal-weight cats on a dry food diet, the study also found that indoor confinement and inactivity, being a greedy eater and being overweight were also associated with an increased risk of Diabetes Mellitus in cats.

“Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Cats” is the largest case-control study about diabetic cats to date. The web-based survey, which was conducted over a four-month period, evaluated 2,066 cats—396 with Diabetes Mellitus and 1,670 control cats—based on 48 questions that focused on the cat’s age, breed, sex, neutering status and body condition, as well as questions regarding the cat’s general health, eating behavior and routine, and activity level, among others.  

To learn more about the study, please contact Stephanie Peters, ACVIM at 303.231.9933 x 105 or stephanie@acvim.org. Additional information regarding the results and all those involved in the study can be found in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

About the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM)
The American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of animals and people through education, training and certification of specialists in veterinary internal medicine, discovery and dissemination of new medical knowledge, and increasing public awareness of advances in veterinary medical care. ACVIM is the certifying organization for veterinary specialists in cardiology, large animal internal medicine, neurology, oncology and small animal internal medicine.

The Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM), the official publication of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, provides an international forum for communication and discussion of the latest developments in large and small animal internal medicine. As an open access journal, all articles published by the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine are available online to read, download and share.

ACVIM hosts the ACVIM Forum, an annual continuing education meeting where cutting-edge information, technology and research abstracts are showcased for the veterinary community. More than 3,300 veterinary specialists, veterinarians, technicians and students typically attend.

ACVIM is also a collaborator with the American College of Veterinary Surgeons on a recently launched website www.VetSpecialists.com, which provides a unique resource to animal owners about veterinary specialty medicine.

About the Swedish University of Agricultural Science
The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) develops the understanding and sustainable use and management of biological natural resources. This is achieved by research, education and environmental monitoring and assessment, in collaboration with the surrounding community.

# # #

Media Contact:
Stephanie Peters
303.231.9933 x 105
stephanie@acvim.org

Get Your News in the Hands of Journalists Focused on the Pet Industry

Don't delay. Order your press release today!

Pin It on Pinterest

CONTACT US